Set The Tone For The Week

“Your Monday morning thoughts set the tone for your whole week. See yourself getting stronger, and living a fulfilling, happier & healthier life.”
― Germany Kent

  1. Wake up- (EARLY) Meditate 10 minutes – express gratitude for life, loved ones, and your health.
  2.  Stretch- 10 minutes to get the blood flowing and work on flexibility
  3.  Hydrate with water first and then coffee
  4.  Eat a healthy breakfast- fruit, organic oatmeal, eggs, yogurt, nuts
  5.  Tell your loved ones you love them
  6.  Listen to positive affirmations on your way to work. Tell yourself it’s going to be a great day 🙂
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The Million Dollar Question

“Everyone is driven by the need to fill their life with meaning. Sometimes this need is articulated clearly and then a purpose emerges and that leads to a sense of direction and a sense of mission. Most times it is not. So the void is filled with action. People have kids, gets mortgages, raise families, pay bills, go to work each day without asking why and then, some day, they die. Some times all this is enough. Many times it’s not. Action fills the void nicely. Makes each day feel tiring. But without a sense of purpose. Without a sense of vision, it leads to a pattern of behavior that doesn’t lead anywhere. Most times we die before we realize this of course.”
― David Amerland

Friday Motivation Barbell Workout

“You only get one body; it is the temple of your soul. Even God is willing to dwell there. If you truly treat your body like a temple, it will serve you well for decades. If you abuse it you must be prepared for poor health and a lack of energy.”
― Oli Hille, Creating the Perfect Lifestyle

 

 

Warmup: 7 to 10 minutes

Circuit One: (12 reps each) Repeat 3x

Barbell Deadlift

Pushup/Side Plank

Jump Squats

 

Circuit Two: (12 reps each) Repeat 3x

Clean and Press

Barbell Row with Bicep

Burpee Mountain Climbers

 

Circuit Three: (12 reps each) Repeat 3x

Barbell Squat

Barbell Chest Press 10 Reps/ Tricep Press 10 Reps

Walkover Plank/ Plank Jacks

 

Ab Circuit: (12 reps each) Repeat 3x

Reverse Crunch

Scissors

In and Outs

Plank One Minute

Cool down and Stretch

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Live Life With No Regrets

When we live each day with kindness, compassion, and communicative love, there is no business left unfinished. There are no regrets or words we should have said, but didn’t. There is no need for closure or forgiveness or apology of any kind.” 
― Tyler Henry

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Ten Minute Yin Yoga Practice

Yin Yoga is a practice in which you hold lying and seating poses for three to five minutes. This type of yoga focuses on flexibility and restoration. Try my ten minute practice in the morning to loosen up tight muscles or to help you wind down before bedtime. Focus on breathing slowly in and out through the nose that will help create warmth in the body and promote relaxation. Try to clear your thoughts and focus on a mind body connection as you try to relax in each pose.

You’ll need a mat, water, and an optional blanket for a prop if needed.

Wide Knee Child’s Pose  (Hold for 3 minutes)

Sphinx Pose (Hold for 3 minutes)

Swan Pose (Hold for 2 minutes on each leg)

Finish with an optional pose called Legs up the Wall  3 to 5 minutes

Friday Motivation Ten Minute Abs

I love teaching my Friday weight training class and try to put a different spin on it every week.  Class will start with total body weight training and then I plan to finish with this quick and effective ab routine.  Do this three to four times per week and tweak your diet with a specific goal to drink more water and eliminate processed foods. You’ll be surprised how quickly you start to see results!

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ABS/ CORE CIRCUIT –

Perform each exercise for one minute and try to complete entire circuit 2x

1.  Glider Plank Walk & Knee Tuck –This is one of my all time favorite.  To work the abs efficiently you need to engage the stability of the core.  This is done with gliders but you can use small towels under your feet or your socks will work to allow your feet to slide while performing the exercise. Perform this exercise for 1 minute

 

2.  Burpee + Four Mountain ClimbersI love this exercise.  It works the entire body and the mountain climbers really challenge your abs/core. 

Perform this exercise for 1 minute

 

3.  Up Down Plank – This exercise is tougher than it looks.  Try leading with one arm for thirty seconds and then change lead arms to complete the minute.  Modify on your knees if needed.

Perform this exercise for 1 minute

 

4.  Plank Jacks With Knee Tuck-  Love this but it’s a tough exercise for one minute. Challenge yourself!

Perform this exercise for 1 minute

 

5.  Pilates Double Leg Stretch–  Pilates is an amazing way to get your abs into shape and your core strong.  Try this for 30 seconds, hug your knees into the chest and recover for 10 seconds and then finish with 20 more seconds of the exercise.

Perform this exercise for 1 minute

 

Stretch, Recover, and Hydrate

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Try my easy, healthy, green juice to help to hydrate and recover from your workout! Two Ingredient Healthy Juice

Overzealous Resolutions And Injury

If your resolutions are to lose fifty pounds and acquire a six-pack in two weeks, you could be headed for trouble. Or did you set lofty goals and decide to run a marathon or sign-up for a triathlon this year? That could be a problem if you don’t have a clue how to get started and expect to dive right in without a plan.

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It’s easy to have false expectations and become impatient when it comes to weight loss and fitness goals. Losing weight and building muscle takes time. Therefore, It’s imperative to set realistic goals and have a well thought out fitness plan.

Learn to avoid setbacks and injuries by following these four tips for success:

1. Hire a professional -If you’re a newbie to working out, it’s important to enlist the advise of a certified fitness professional. It’s vital to set a time frame, realistic goals, and write down specific steps to help you gain progress while avoiding injuries and setbacks. Your health is your greatest asset and well worth the investment.

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2. Make sure you always warm-up, cool-down, and stretch before workouts –The warm-up elevates your body temperature and increases blood flow to your joints and muscles to safely prepare your body for your workout. The cool-down and stretching will help your heart rate return to normal and helps prevent muscle soreness and injury.

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3. Learn the balance between overload and recovery -Over-training can occur when you don’t recover sufficiently from your workouts. Signs to look for can be an elevated resting heart rate, ongoing muscle soreness, irritability, weight loss, and decreased performance.

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Per breakingmuscle.com Recovery Is About Creating Balance : Training is about creating enough of a stimulus to force the body out of its comfort zone, therefore making it get stronger, bigger, or more fit. This happens through a physiological process we call adaptation. As the body starts to adapt to the stimulus, the athlete or trainee has to keep pushing the body more and more in order to keep making progress. Many of those involved in the fitness industry understand this principle, but what gets lost in translation is that in order to create that adaptation to the exercise stress, athletes and trainees need to rest appropriately with proper recovery.

Therefore, always consult a fitness professional if you are unsure how to progress safely towards your goals

4. Have patience and enjoy the process– It’s easy to want to see results overnight or take shortcuts in your training, but patience is key. Your body needs to adapt safely to the overload in your workouts. Don’t be tempted to take shortcuts by increasing the weights, reps or intensity of your workouts before your body is ready. You can’t expect to run a marathon if you haven’t done the work. You need to start with short runs and slowly build your mileage each week. Follow a well designed program that is specifically designed to help you reach your goals. Take some time each week to keep a journal of your progress and accomplishments It will be well worth it when you start to see your body transform or run over that finish line.

Aging With No Filter

I’ve officially been calling myself a “snow bird” for the past several years. My husband and I travel to Florida during the winter months each year to escape the cold weather and enjoy some quiet time at the beach.

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Although I thought I would be bored to tears and miss home; I’ve learned to embrace this time in my life.fb_img_1519401864040

Now that I’ve accepted the fact that I’m considered a “senior” and a snow bird, I’ve found myself reflecting more on the aging process. It blows my mind that in two years I will be sixty!?! Where has the time gone?? I still feel like I’m only in my forties and have to remind myself often that I’m now falling into the DREADED categories of: senior, geriatric, old lady, over the hill etc. Yes, if you live long enough, not only will you have to deal with gray hair and wrinkles, you will most likely be subjected to ageism. Merriam Webster defines

Ageism:

Definition of ageism

: prejudice or discrimination against a particular age-group and especially the elderly

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Sociology In Focus reports:

Becoming older is a privilege denied to many,” the saying goes. But, are you excited about getting older? When I ask my students this question they often say things like, “No way!” and follow with a list of negative stereotypes describing older adults as sick, unhappy, slow, and sexually inactive. How do so many of us, including myself, come to this conclusion?

The aging population (i.e., individuals 65 and over) around the world is growing. In the U.S. alone, one in seven persons is now an older American, and this number is expected to double by 2060. As we’ve previously discussed here at Sociology In Focus with other concepts (seasons, time, etc.) aging is also socially constructed.

A Youth Obsessed Society

The U.S. has often been described as a youth obsessed society. Some have argued that aging is a fate worse than death. During 2014, nearly 13 billion dollars was spent on plastic surgery with the bulk of procedures performed on women 40 and older. The sale of anti-aging skin care products is also a booming business. U.S. consumers now spend more on anti-aging medications than on drugs for disease. Clearly people are feeling pressure to maintain their youth.

It’s no wonder that once we pass the ripe old age of thirty-nine, many of us turn to desperate measures such as Botox and plastic surgery. Therefore, along with our shrinking self-image comes a multitude of other potential issues such as an increased risk for health problems and immobility.

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Heidi Godman Executive Editor, of the Harvard Health Letter reports:

Loss of mobility, which is common among older adults, has profound social, psychological, and physical consequences. “If you’re unable to get out then you can’t go shopping, you can’t go out with your friends to eat dinner or go to the movies, and you become dependent on other people to get you places. So you become a recluse, you stay home, you get depressed. With immobilization comes incontinence, because you can’t get to the bathroom, you can develop urinary infections, skin infections. The list goes on,” says geriatrician Dr. Suzanne Salamon, an instructor at Harvard Medical School.

The cascade of negative effects that comes with immobility can often be prevented or limited, according to a review in today’s JAMA. Researchers from the University of Alabama at Birmingham looked at dozens of mobility studies published over the years. They discovered common factors that lead to loss of mobility, such as older age, low physical activity, obesity, impaired strength and balance, and chronic diseases such as diabetes and arthritis. Less common red flags included symptoms of depression, problems with memory or thinking skills, being female, a recent hospitalization, drinking alcohol or smoking, and having feelings of helplessness. Individuals with one or more of these factors is at risk for immobility.

A greater risk of health issues and immobility reinforces the importance of optimizing your health as you get older. For this very reason, I’m fortunate to be employed in the health and fitness industry that requires me to stay active and make healthy food choices.

However, along with that comes a increased focus on body image by my peers and clients. It’s common to see images of young, muscular, fit people in health and fitness magazines, fitness infomercials, and television ads etc. Furthermore, most of my co-workers, and clients are in their early thirties and forties. Therefore I’ve begun to question how do I continue to work in the health and fitness industry at this stage of my life. How do I fight to keep up with a society that is consumed with youth, appearance, and selfies?

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As a fitness instructor I constantly hear women comparing themselves to others, complaining about their age, scrutinizing their bodies, appearance, and fitness level. Over the years, I’ve seen many resort to plastic surgery for breast implants, liposuction, face lifts, and Botox. I on the other hand have decided against any nips, tucks, or enhancements. I know it’s crazy, but I’ve accepted that I’m getting older and I’m determined to age gracefully the “good old-fashioned way!”

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At this stage in my life, I’m surprised that I find myself comfortable with my appearance, my body, and my fitness level. I actually have more self-confidence than I ever had in my 20’s, 30’s or 40’s. My goal is to simply age with style and grace. I plan to take care of myself by simply exercising and making healthy food choices.

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Simply put, my goal is to promote healthy aging. I truly believe “age is just a number.” Your lifestyle, food choices, and activity level play a huge part in how you age. The picture below is a picture of me and my dad when I was in my thirties.

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This is me age 35

Now fast forward twenty years to my current picture below at the age of 58. Yes I have wrinkles around my eyes and I look older but that is a part of life. My point is that many people simply stop taking care of themselves as they get older. It’s typical to slow down once your children are gone and we transition from a busy work career and family life to empty nest and retirement. It’s this sedentary lifestyle and poor food choices that causes rapid aging, weight gain, and increased risk for disease.

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Although many experts report that losing weight after forty will make you look older, the truth is weight gain makes you look older. Quite often as we age, weight accumulates in the mid section, which can put strain on the heart, muscles, and joints. Ultimately these lifestyle choices increase the risk for heart disease and diabetes. The key is to maintain a healthy stable weight as you age. It’s the yo-yo dieting and the drastic weight loss that causes the face to look drawn and appear more wrinkled.

So how do we maintain good health and a more youthful appearance as we age? How can we live life in our golden years without filters, Photoshop, and going under the knife? As much as we would like to believe in magic weight loss pills and procedures. There are no tricks; these methods don’t work.

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We all age and no amount of liposuction, face-lift, Botox, or weight loss gimmicks are going to make us look twenty again. Learn to love yourself, your wrinkles, your age, and your life experience. The answer to aging with no filter is simple. All you have to do is work hard, eat right, and don’t give up.

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For more tips on aging gracefully check out my article, Age Gracefully With These Five Tips

Last Killer Workout Of 2018

This will be my last workout I’ll be teaching for 2018.  How can I make it different than all the other workouts this year?  I love to combine body weight, cardio intervals, and weight training into all my classes.  So hear we go:

Make sure to warm up for 7- 8 minutes.  Complete circuit 3-4 times.  Take water breaks as needed and finish with final stretch.  ENJOY!

 

  1.  Bear Crawl Push-up (12 reps)

 

2.  Wall Sit With Bicep Curl (12 reps)

 

3.  Alternating DB Reverse Lunge With Burpee (12 reps)

 

4.  Burpee Wood Chop Tricep Extension (12 reps)

 

5.  DB Clean And Press Row Combo (12 reps)

 

6.  Standing DB Alternating Knee Crunches (12 reps)

 

7.  Plank Jack Push Up (12 reps)

 

8.  Mountain Climber To Side Plank (12 reps)

No Resolutions New Year’s Challenge

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Ditch the resolutions and start the new year off with an easy plan for success. Try my No Resolutions New Year Challenge that will help you improve your health and fitness level in thirty days.

Resolutions often fail because most people don’t fully understand the commitment required to create new habits. Change is often uncomfortable, and when things get hard, it’s easy to give up and revert back to old habits. However, adding small changes to your daily routine can lead to big results. Instead of setting unattainable resolutions for the new year, try this thirty-day challenge that works by adding small steps each week to get you on track to a healthier lifestyle.

Always check with your physician before starting any new diet or exercise program

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Try to begin the challenge January 1st. Week one will start with two goals and you will add two new steps each week to help you create new healthy habits. At the end of the thirty days you should feel lighter, stronger, more energetic, and be on your way to a healthier lifestyle.

Hopefully by the end of the month you will continue some or all of the new habits you developed during the thirty days.

LET THIS NEW YEAR be your turning point to self care and better health! Let me know how you like it. LET’S BEGIN –

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WEEK ONE

  1. DRINK 20 oz of lemon water before breakfast, lunch, and your evening meal.

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2. Add exercise each day by taking a brisk walk/ jog 15 minutes in the morning and 15 minutes in the evening. Or you can try this 15 minute workout video two times per day.

WEEK TWO (Continue week one goals and add these two goals to your daily routine)

  1. Track your sugar grams and keep them under 30 grams per day
  2. Add a green vegetable to your lunch and evening meal each day

WEEK THREE (Continue week one and two goals and add these additional goals to your daily routine)

  1. Add 15 minutes of yoga to your calendar twice a week-

2. Try a green smoothie for breakfast each morning- Use your own recipe or try this Delicious Green Protein Smoothie

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WEEK FOUR (Continue with week one, two, & three goals, and add these two new goals to your final week of the thirty-day challenge)

  1. Add a salad to your meal each day this week ( try these make a head salad in a Jar) recipes: Mason Jar Salad ideas

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2. Make one day of the week a NO MEAT day – Here are some ideas for vegetarian meals: 58 Best Vegetarian Recipes

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